The Danish Zebras

This picture was also taken in the Lion park in Denmark in early June. Over the years I’ve learned (along with a lot of people) that Zoos and any place involving animals as an attraction can be a tricky situation. There are places that ignore the animals welfare for the sake of earning money and entertaining people, and there are the places where the animal welfare is considered the key thing. The thing is to be aware that it’s happening, such as many ongoing issues in the world, and support the places that make a home for the animals or the organizations that support the wild life where it lives.

There are places that ignore the animals welfare for the sake of earning money and entertaining people, and there are the places where the animal welfare is considered the key thing. The thing is to be aware that it’s happening, such as many ongoing issues in the world, and support the places that make a home for the animals or the organizations that support the wild life where it lives.

As far as I could tell, the animals at Givskud Zoo had a lot of space and places to hide if they felt like it. And it seems like they’ve worked to make sure the animals like the area and the fellow animals.

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Crossing borders

Crossing borders can be a strange thing. I’ve grown up in a Europe post the Schengen Agreement (at least the part of my life I remember), so the crossing of borders has often been “OK, according to the signs, we’ve passed the border now”. Lately, the borders have been more enforced, but to a varying degree.

Last year we went in a car with Norwegian plates between Norway, Denmark, Sweden, and back to Norway again, and there was some variation. Norway to Denmark was getting off a boat, and no checking of passports. Going from Denmark to Sweden it seemed like it was enough to be white and female in a Norwegian car. And from Sweden to Norway we started to hand them our passports, but seeing the outside seemed to be enough.

This year, between Norway, Denmark, and Germany, there was also not much checking. But it seems noticeable in a different way than when I was a kid. Mostly because of the media and the ferry company telling us to remember our passports, because they’ll check, but also because

But it seems noticeable in a different way than when I was a kid. Mostly because of the media and the ferry company telling us to remember our passports, because they might check them, but also because I pay attention to it in a different way as an adult. Are the borders noticeable if you cross them where you live? And do the people and affairs surrounding the borders affect how you feel when you cross them (if you can)?

Are the borders noticeable if you cross them where you live? And do the people and affairs surrounding the borders affect how you feel when you cross them (if you can)?

This picture was taken as we entered Norway driving north on E6 through Sweden in late July 2017.

The Stones of Jelling

Jelling is a place with a long history. The stones I’m referring to are not the ones actually in the picture, but two stones dating back to the time of the Vikings. If you want to find out more, the National Museum of Denmark has written about the Jelling project right here.

We stopped by Jelling after we had visited Givskudd Zoo, and went up on one of the two hills around the church. This is the view from that in early June 2017.

The University of Agder

This is the University of Agder, or at least a part of it. This is Campus Kristiansand, which is one of the campuses of UiA. (I’ve written about the University before here and here.)

I’ve been a student here the last three years, and while it’s been weird knowing I’m not going back in August, it’s also slightly good. It was three great years with plenty of good teachers, fellow students, and fun stuff, but good things must come to an end to move forward with one’s life.

The picture was taken on a very nice day in early April 2017, when I needed a break from studies.

Dancing

This picture was taken in mid-March 2017, near Bertesbukta in Kristiansand. It’s a graffiti piece, a heart and a dancer on top of the heart. I needed some air during the semester, and the piece was pretty easy to find on a cliff overlooking the ocean.

Over the last years the attitude towards graffiti has changed a lot in Norway. There has been multiple laws against it (and probably still is, so don’t go crazy with the paint yet), but slowly it has become a more accepted, often welcomed, part of the cityscape. By which I mean that there are buildings offered up to paint on, and there are guided tours to see the different pieces. Examples are Stavanger where there is the NuArt festival and Kristiansand that also decorates parts of the city with street art.

Wind in Denmark?

One of the things Denmark is known for is being flat. And if the land is flat, wind power with the help from wind turbines is also a thing Denmark is known for. To be quite honest, I don’t know how the wind turbine systems works, so I’ll link to the wikipedia article about wind power in Denmark, that seems to have a lot of links that one could learn from.

This picture was taken while driving (well, being a passenger) north on Jutland in early June 2017.

The former school on the Kings street

This is an old school building in the city centre of Kristiansand known as Kongensgate skole (the Kings street school). The building itself was built 1897-1899, and the architect was Richard Mauritz Tønnesen. As a fun fact about the building, you might see that there is a difference in the windows on the building. It was apparently meant to be that the different floors of the building had windows with a different shapes.

The building is no longer in use as a school, and has been used for multiple things the last couple of years, including plays and a place for beggars and others to spend the night in the winter. It is currently being discussed what is to be done with the place, and it seems it will be turned into apartments at some point.

This picture was taken in mid-February 2017, where the streets Kongens gate and Holbergs gate cross, and the building is situated.

Giraffes in Denmark?

In early June I went on a road trip to Denmark (with a quick stop in Germany as well), and one of the places we visited was Givskudd Zoo.

Givskudd Zoo started in 1969 with lions as only animal, and is therefore known as Løveparken (the lion park) for many. Now there are many more species, where giraffes are one of them. The zoo and safari park has large enclosures for the animals, and it’s possible to walk and drive around parts of the park.

The red boxes that aren’t busses

When visiting London as a tourist, you’ll focus on some of the red stuff to be found in the city. Whether it be the red busses or the phone boxes. Possibly because they stick out in the city, possibly because they’re obvious things telling you where you are without needing to be in the middle of a people-filled landmark, also it’s what book, tv-shows and movies show from London.

This picture was taken in mid-April 2016 in Bayswater in London. Walking around we passed these phone boxes when there weren’t that many around, so if felt like a nice time to capture them.

Ruten in Sandnes

Ruten in Sandnes is not the prettiest place, but it usually serves its purpose. It’s mostly a place-to-arrange-stuff/parking-space/etc. The picture was taken late July 2013, when they were getting ready for the yearly Blink-festival hosted in Sandnes. The Blink-festival is a Ski-festival held in the summer, without any snow. The skis are roller-skis, and usually at least parts of the Norwegian National teams in Cross-Country and Biathlon will compete with other great international athletes. You can read more about the event here.